Author(s):

  • Aylin Ilhan
  • Kaja Joanna Fietkiewicz 

Abstract:

Nowadays, many people have to increasingly deal with the question “How can I improve my health?” Fortunately, the market for wearable technologies (e.g., Fitbit or Garmin) supports people by enabling them to track, monitor, and analyze their physical activity. Despite the technological component, in order for the wearables to be successful, important are the user engagement design and (enhancing) users’ motivation. This can be achieved with well-conceived integration of gamification elements in the fitness tracker mobile applications. A successful user engagement design of the fitness tracker applications can not only motivate the users to continually apply the service but also inspire them to be more active in the long term. There are several theories dealing with user motivation and which were considered relevant for this research: goal orientation theory, self-determination theory, and flow theory. This study concentrates on ten wearable products and their fitness tracking applications, (1) to compare the integrated gamification mechanics, (2) to analyze possible dynamics triggered by these mechanics, and (3) to identify user engagement designs supporting long-term learning and engagement in a healthier lifestyle.


Documentation:

https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-64301-4_16

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