Author:

  • Alphonsus Keary
  • Paul Walsh

Abstract:

This paper primarily relates to the engineering of affective (emotional) computing (AC) capabilities in machines and also considers how such developments may be used to advance the quantified self (QS) paradigm. Our work will provide a literature and technology review providing some general insights and discussion around AC applications, technologies, tools, platforms and alternative controls/interfaces. Specific focus from a quantified self perspective will also be addressed with applied literature references from the affective sciences research community. Readers new to the field will take away a solid understanding of what AC is, how it is impacting on new software innovations and how it relates to QS. Those with existing expertise will gain new research insights, learn about new research projects and software development platforms and will also learn about applied AC and QS research.

Document:

https://doi.org/10.1109/BIBM.2014.6999285

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