Author(s):

  • Menychtas, Andreas
  • Doukas, Charalampos
  • Tsanakas, Panayiotis
  • Maglogiannis, Ilias

Abstract:

The abundance of activity trackers and biosignal sensors as well as the evolution of IoT and communication technologies have considerably advanced the concept of Quantified-Self. Nowadays there are several frameworks and applications that realize the concept, focusing though strictly on specific areas, from daily use to professional activities such as sport and healthcare. This work proposes a versatile, cross-domain solution for building quantified-self applications exploiting the capacities for open-design, modularity and extensibility of the AGILE IoT gateway.

Document:

https://doi.org/10.1109/CBMS.2017.80

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